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Beware: ICANN Domain Upgrade Notice Hoax

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ICANN domain upgrade notice hoax is making its way around the web. So, if you receive an email with the following, you can be ensured that it’s a hoax. Whatever you do, do not click on the link or visit the site! Delete the email immediately.

Dear Domain Account Holder,

You are being sent this notice from ICANN due to the fact that you currently own an active domain name. ICANN is currently upgrading all domains from their registry database.

The upgrade will introduce new control options for your domain and easier access. The new upgrade is required by the registry. All domain users are expected to submit their domain information manually at icannresolve.com with the required information for ICANN to apply the required updates.

The upgrades will be applied to accounts on a first come, first serve basis. You have until July 25, 2008 to submit the required information to avoid service and domain interruption.

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

ICANNResolve
ICANN.org Resolutions Department

How to identify hoax emails

The sure way to avoid ever being ensnared by a hoax or phishing scam (a phishing scam is an email that sends you to a site that attempts to capture personal and private information, including credit cards, social security numbers, etc.) is to never click on an email link. Instead, visit the website directly by typing it into your web browser.

Only type in websites you know

The bottom line when dealing with emails is that they can be modified to look like they came from anyone, and websites can be modified to look like they are legitimate (ie. from someone else). Never visit a website that contains a legitimate domain (in this case icannresolve.com) – you want to only visit the original websites (such as icann.org), and not a variation of them. It’s obvious trademark infringement for the hoaxer to use the word “icann” in the domain name, but if they don’t care about deceiving you and stealing your personal information, they’re not going to care much about this either.


About Alex Schenker
Alex bring a series of in-depth articles on search marketing and content management systems as well as troubleshooting tips to We Rock Your Web's collection. He is an avid tennis player, nature enthusiast, and hiker, and enjoys spending time with his wife, friends, and dogs, Bella and Lily.
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